In order that a child experiences the full breadth of the science curriculum throughout their school life at High Littleton, it is important that we are clear about our long-term planning.

 

In a small school where vertical grouping is often our only option this long-term planning also has to have built-in flexibility.

 

Whilst the National Curriculum sets out the Programmes of Study by year group we are only required to teach them by the end of each Key Stage. We therefore have the flexibility to introduce content earlier or later within each key stage if appropriate.

 

It will be the role of the science co-ordinator to oversee that by the end of key stage one, end of lower key stage 2 and the end of upper key stage two each pupil has covered the relevant programmes of study. It will be the role of each teacher to plan when and how each programme of study is covered during the two years.

 

The planning should always take into account the coverage of the previous years and as such it will be essential to know what the children in each class have already covered. At the end of each academic year each class teacher will be asked to indicate the curriculum covered for each cohort in their class. This should act as a “provision map” to ensure not only where the child has been within their science education but also where they need to be going. Once this process has taken place the science co-ordinator will display the planned programmes of study for each class on the website (a governmental directive).

 

 

Available resources to facilitate planning for an exciting, fun and meaningful science curriculum for our children include:

  • Scholastic 100 Science Lessons (one book and CD rom per year group)

  • Tom Robson 2011

  • Purple Mash (computer assisted learning)

 

Other resources which teachers find helpful:

 

 

Key Stage 1

 

The principal focus of science teaching in key stage 1 is to enable pupils to experience and observe phenomena, looking more closely at the natural and humanly-constructed world around them. They should be encouraged to be curious and ask questions about what they notice. They should be helped to develop their understanding of scientific ideas by using different types of scientific enquiry to answer their own questions, including observing changes over a period of time, noticing patterns, grouping and classifying things, carrying out simple comparative tests, and finding things out using secondary sources of information. They should begin to use simple scientific language to talk about what they have found out and communicate their ideas to a range of audiences in a variety of ways. Most of the learning about science should be done through the use of first-hand practical experiences, but there should also be some use of appropriate secondary sources, such as books, photographs and videos.

 

‘Working scientifically’ is described separately in the programme of study, but must always be taught through and clearly related to the teaching of substantive science content in the programme of study. Throughout the notes and guidance, examples show how scientific methods and skills might be linked to specific elements of the content.

 

Pupils should read and spell scientific vocabulary at a level consistent with their increasing word reading and spelling knowledge at key stage 1.

LOWER Key Stage 2

 

The principal focus of science teaching in lower key stage 2 is to enable pupils to broaden their scientific view of the world around them. They should do this through exploring, talking about, testing and developing ideas about everyday phenomena and the relationships between living things and familiar environments, and by beginning to develop their ideas about functions, relationships and interactions. They should ask their own questions about what they observe and make some decisions about which types of scientific enquiry are likely to be the best ways of answering them, including observing changes over time, noticing patterns, grouping and classifying things, carrying out simple comparative and fair tests and finding things out using secondary sources of information. They should draw simple conclusions and use some scientific language, first, to talk about and, later, to write about what they have found out.

 

‘Working scientifically’ is described separately at the beginning of the programme of study, but must always be taught through and clearly related to substantive science content in the programme of study. Throughout the notes and guidance, examples show how scientific methods and skills might be linked to specific elements of the content.

 

Pupils should read and spell scientific vocabulary correctly and with confidence, using their growing word reading and spelling knowledge.

Upper Key Stage 2

 

The principal focus of science teaching in upper key stage 2 is to enable pupils to develop a deeper understanding of a wide range of scientific ideas. They should do this through exploring and talking about their ideas; asking their own questions about scientific phenomena; and analysing functions, relationships and interactions more systematically. At upper key stage 2, they should encounter more abstract ideas and begin to recognise how these ideas help them to understand and predict how the world operates. They should also begin to recognise that scientific ideas change and develop over time. They should select the most appropriate ways to answer science questions using different types of scientific enquiry, including observing changes over different periods of time, noticing patterns, grouping and classifying things, carrying out comparative and fair tests and finding things out using a wide range of secondary sources of information. Pupils should draw conclusions based on their data and observations, use evidence to justify their ideas, and use their scientific knowledge and understanding to explain their findings.

 

‘Working and thinking scientifically’ is described separately at the beginning of the programme of study, but must always be taught through and clearly related to substantive science content in the programme of study. Throughout the notes and guidance, examples show how scientific methods and skills might be linked to specific elements of the content.

 

Pupils should read, spell and pronounce scientific vocabulary correctly.

Science

 

Contact us:

01761 470622

High Littleton C of E Primary School
Church Hill, High Littleton, Bristol, BS39 6HF

Headteacher:  Mr Gareth Griffith

© 2023 by High Littleton Primary